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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the left in the united states has plenty of problems with science when it comes to issues they don't support. it's about an hour and a half. >> my name is kenneth agreement and a resident scholar here at the enterprise institute and i work on primarily energy and environmental policy issues. i'm a scientist as well as alex and my doctoral degree is environmental science and engineering. so i am really excited to have this event today on science called "science left behind," alex's great book, and before we start, if i seem a little fuzzy you've seen the commercial that goes something like this when you pay too much for cable you through things and if you throw things people think you have anger issues some people think you have anger issues in your schedule up and you grow a scraggly beard and you start taking in stray animals and you can't stop taking in stray animals don't pay much for cable. i have my own version today to the appeal to the kafeel you have a checkup and when he gives you a check that you have a flu shot at a tetanus booster. when you have the booster do we get th
the politics, what fdr called the science of human relationships, paid off. and i think that that's hugely important. and i mean it. i mean, dinner does not always end well. you can talk to jesus about that, you know? [laughter] never mind. never mind about that. [laughter] that's not here. last thing quickly, the politics of hope, every successful american president has convinced us that present pain is really an investment can and that a sacrifice in in the moment is not simply to be austere, for austerity's sake, but to make tomorrow better than today. whatever they can, they will, jefferson of americans. and the idea, he said i like the dreams of the future better than the history of the past which is very painful for me because i like both, of course. but he was able to project a vision of a reality that we could not see, but that he wanted us to reach. and i think that that's absolutely essential. as i said, we always learn more from sinners than from saints. his role in the perpetuation and protection of slavery is the great standing conviction, it's not an indictment, it's a convic
. she has 51 of honorary degrees. she has been the first of everything -- the national science foundation. she was the very first black woman to get a ph.d. at and i.t.. [applause] she is an expert in medicare and medicaid and all things health. she has been called the health czar of america. the point guard over hauling the system. how about that for a job? what a powerhouse right here. so we actually have a lot of brainpower up here. all of you could have done very different things. you had a lot of choices. i would love to hear about how you ended up taking what you did. who wants to start? >> a failed of violinist. i was raised to be a musician. my mother still asks may what happened. i was always interested in politics and writing stories for the paper. it actually was complete serendipity. i was in college and was at a meeting of the naacp. we had some big issues. this was the 1960's and we heard music down the hall. it was the college radio station and i was drawn to it. i pitched in and begin programming classical music. and they needed somebody to help with the news. i
and steady passions and interests, to that extent, there will be a new science of politics. the science of politics based on what all human beings have in common, acknowledged supplied by the senses. because people do not agree about religious truths, and because they fight over their disagreements, social tranquility is served by regarding religion as voluntary matter for private judgment. not state-supported and state enforced. in the interest of social peace, the higher aspirations of the ancient political philosophers were pushed to the margins of modern politics. those aspirations were considered, at best, unrealistic. at worst, downright dangerous. henceforth, politics would not be a sphere in which human nature is perfected. political project would not include appointing people towards their highest potentials. instead, a modern politics would be based on the assumption that people will express and will act upon the strong impulses of their flawed nature's. the ancients had asked, what is the highest of which mankind is capable? how can we pursue this in politics? hobbes asked, w
and time she was putting into her appearance. >> i want to move to science. it is such a huge thing these days about the lack of women in science. in some universities, only 10% of the teachers are female. what can we do to get more women motivated to go into science and why is it important? >> >> talk about why they are not there first. it begins very early in terms of which women are exposed to, the expectations. it is a lot of hard work. science is a funny business because one is not always in the limelight. that is kind of public affirmation that is not there until one is a fair distance down the road and becomes an instant entrepreneur or something like that. a lot of what happens to women will happen within the community within which they work. a lot of the attitudes get reinforced. i think what needs to happen is we have to try to reach young women early. we have to affirm them. as a society, we have to value science and those who do it more. everything we like to play with, including broadcast media and health care, they are rooted in scientific discovery and technological i
in good standing, has the assumption that as science, rationalism, and the rationality of society advances, the disenchantment of the world proceeds apace, forces will lose their history shaping saliency. the two biggest forces are religion and ethnicity. everyday, in every region, people refute this. religion, and especially religion entangled with reinforcing ethnicity, still drive histoes history. religion is also central to america's public philosophy. at the risk of offending the specialists, let me offer a brief placement of america's founders in the stream of world political philosophy. machiavelli begins modern political philosophy. his is a demarcation between the ancients and the moderns. the ancients took their political bearings from their understanding of the best of which people were capable. they sought to and large the likelihood of the emergence of fine and noble leaders. and the fine and noble attributes among them. machiavelli took his bearings from people as they are. he defined the political project as making the best of this flawed material. he knew, almost t
of choice meaning they kind of look like they are science science-fiction and that is deliberate. they are sort of modeled after science-fiction in order to appeal to the network engineers that are deciding where to put their network connections and where to connect to other networks. so when you walk and it's a bit like walking into a machine. their buildings inside are incredibly loud but incredibly cold from all the air-conditioners to keep the equipment cool. hugh also have a heated ceiling to obscure cables and there usually cages around, big steel cages maybe half the size of the hotel room and each belongs to network and that is where they keep their equipment securely and then run a wire to the top of the cage and drop it down into the cage of another network and interconnected that way. that is the physical internet connection and the internet world. >> host: when you look at the infrastructure of the wires of the internet, what did our those wires made of and what are they carrying? >> guest: predominantly the centers of the internet, the most important places, they are
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. [ buzzing ] bye dad. drive safe. k. love you. [ chirping, buzzing continues ] [ horn honks ] [ buzzing continues ] [ male announcer ] the sprint drive first app. blocks and replies to texts while you drive. we can live without the &. visit sprint.com/drive. >>> talking this morning about the next economy. what the economy should and will look like after the great recession after we go back to full employment, if and whenever that ever happens. and how that affects workers. karl, the question on the table is can we have a prosperous economy and also in this increasingly flexible freelance situation? >> people like the security of an employment relationship and as workers have had less and less bargaining power in the market they've lost wage growth and employment growth. those are separate symptoms of the same thing. it's entirely possible to provide that with high wages without those things. those are two things that people like and as they have gotten worse and worse, the
expectancy. it was, and still is, an assumption that as science and the rationality -- as the disenchantment of the world's, pre-modern forces will lose their history. the two most important of these are religion. events refute the liberal expectancy. religion still drives history. religion is also central to the emergence of america's public philosophy. at the risk of offending specialists by distortion through compression, what we offer a very brief placement of americans foundries. machiavelli begins modern political philosophy. this spot is a convenient demarcation. the agents -- ancients saw to enlarge the likelihood of the emergence of noble leaders. machiavelli, however, took his bearings from people as they are. he defined the political project as making the best of this flawed material. he knew that nothing would ever be made from the crooked timber of humanity. machiavelli was no democrat. he reoriented politics towards accommodations, strong and predictable forces rising from a great constant, human nature common to all people in all stations. for 44 years, machiavelli and luther
like a science fiction movie, and that's deliberate. they're sort of modeled after science fiction in order to appeal to the network engineers that are deciding where to put their network connections and where to connect to other networks. so when you walk in, it's a bit like walking into a machine. inside they're incredibly loud, incredibly cold from all the air conditioners that keep the equipment cool. you often can't see the ceiling because it's obscured with cables. and there are usually cages around, you know, big steel cages maybe half the size of a hotel room that each belongs to a network, and that's where they keep their equipment securely and then run a wire up to the top of the cage and drop it down into the cage of another network and interconnect that way. that is the actual physical interconnection in the internet work. >> host: when you look at the infrastructure of the wires of the internet, what are those wires made of, and what are they carrying? >> guest: the -- predominantly at the centers of the internet, they are fiberoptic cables. they're often yellow fibero
. you say that this is unsound science and potentially could lead to problems. why do you believe that there is not a value in at least looking at this gunman's dna? >> well, first of all, let me say that my heart goes out to all the people in newtown, connecticut. this was an horrific series of events. second of all, the major problem that i have as a geneticist is that it's impossible to gain much information with the sample size of one. so what you are looking at is one person's dna, and you're trying to say that it's different than other people. but you only have a sample size of one. >> would it be helpful, do you think, to look at the dna of other shooters of those from previous mass shootings? >> well, again, the problem is, we have probably less than five or even ten people that we're talking about. when studies -- accurate genetic studies are done on a whole population, we look for hundreds of different people, and you have to show a strong correlation with that. and the second problem would be what are we trying to look for? i mean, we're going -- the whole idea is you'r
and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ dennis: -- >> looked worse earlier, the past hour or so, the dow just in the green, bank of america doing some heavy lifting today. it's the one dow stock hitting new highs. good afternoon, everybody, i'm ashley webster, the last hour ever trading, and the count down to the closing bell begins right now. as i said earlier on, appears the bulls had too much eggnog and christmas cheer thanks to the continued uncertainty of washington, no real progress on a debt deal. the house speaker stuck in a blizzard in ohio, but you know what? the dow managed to raise earlier, just up a hint now, just a touch. meanwhile, the nasdaq, the s&p500, and the russell, as you can see, down slightly on the day after christmas. retail stocks are casting a follow on the market, the s&p500, the high end end names, all in the red. we got coach, high end retailers such as tiffany moving lower, ralph lauren, urban jut fitters lower on poor data on sales this holiday season, and it's
by nutritionist chris crowley and jen sacheck. you need both to do it. >> hard. >> there's science to it. >> there's heavy science and we tell you all about it in the book. >> we know what happens when we eat junk food. we get father, but what happens inside the body? >> a lot of things happen. we eat too much, we gain fat and it's toxic. it surrounds our vital organs, causes a toxic disease. it's killing us. >> there's two things here, what you eat and what you do with your body. what's going on, chris, with our body and what does it take to cement that habit? >> one of the nice things about the book, nice guys don't talk about exercise a lot. we talk about it all the time. it's the flywheel of maintenance. it does all kinds of stuff to help you lose weight, be healthier, more optimistic, or more energetic. we told people it makes a world of sense to work out semi hard six days a week. people go, what? way too scarey. but you have to do it. >> weight's become a bad busquos . >> wheat's become a bad buzz world. >> 1% of the americans have celiac disease and they can't have wheat in their diet. i t
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. david: the president's back at the white house and the senate met today for the first time since going on the holiday break. but seems like the political train is still heading for a cliff. shibani: taking all of us with it. so where are we flow? -- so where are we now, just days away from tax hikes. fox business's rich edson is live from the capitol. where are we rich? any closer or exactly where we were about 12 hours ago? rich: we're about 12 hours closer to the fiscal cliff as far as negotiations are concerned. the senate is in town. they are meeting but not working on anything fiscal cliff related. the house is coming back on sunday evening according to a republican source, eric cantor, the house majority leader making that announcement on a conference call just a couple of hours ago. so they will be in town. but still we're all waiting on some type of agreement from congressional and perhaps the president, leaders, to have some type of framework for democrats and republicans to vote o
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ashley: so what is the bright spot for next year? oppenheimer says it's domino's pizza, anywhere you slice it. the stock moving higher today. right now up just about 1 1/3%, up 56 cents at 43.37. oppenheimer says look the pizza maker in a good position for 2013, thanks to its same-store sales, innovation and international business, oppenheimer also raising its price target on domino's 6 bucks from 44 to 50. it's right now at 43.39. domi domino's up almost 30% for the year. it's been an amazing day. down 148 points at one point. dave asman, shibani joshi turn up and we're up 10 points. take it away. david: it is not the number. it's the turn around. about 150 point turn around. shibani: just to show you how volatile the markets are and how sensitive they are to comments coming out of washington and any advancement on the fiscal debt talks, the talk that congress is coming back to work on sunday, that turned everything around. david: let's go to
universities and allow more education in science and mathematics in the school system which would allow more people to do research in this field. to allow more electric energy instead of so much depending on petroleum and oil. guest: about the education system. the second question is about the role of private enterprise in these technologies. education is the silver bullet and the thing that we can do most cheaply and easily to get kids excited about solving big problems. it needs to begin not in universities but at elementary and high school level education. every year we choose 35 young innovators who we believe have the greatest capacity to change the world. this year most of the 35 lived and worked in the united states, less than five had gone to elementary school in the united states. they came from china, europe, israel. we are not doing a good job in the states in making science and technology a profitable activity, where kids can commit their entire lives and careers to it. the best thing we can do is to invest in science and technology and mathematics education in our elementary and
his nose so bright? well, science has an answer. it's red all right. we will share it with you ahead. ♪ rudolph the red nosed reindeer. you'll go down in history. ♪ with the spark cash card from capital one, sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purche, everday! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great sinesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your invoice. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still "stubbed" up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male announcer ] sorry. alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms plus has a fast acting decongestant to relieve your stuffy nose. [ sighs ] thanks! [ male announcer ] you're
. and even scientifically. the japanese get their religion, can see how far advanced, in the sciences. the chinese can be a religion still today. they did flirt with a religion called communism for a number of years, but only became capitalists and doing well because basically they are rooted in cultures, and from the cultures you evolve all -- so i agree with you absolutely. and one which i forgot to mention was a -- when the slaves went to the americas and they found themselves being banned from studying -- from following their religion. so what they did is said, yes, master, we won't follow our religion but substituted the same for the deities. so until today you'll find st. lazareth. one of the healing sins, st. anthony, the lady of the candles, et cetera, et cetera. they went through that phase, and even evolved a means of re-creating images of their deities in slightly stylized mode so that they could claim that those figures stood for the things and that is how accomplished they were in creating human beings. still today you find this phase existing but also there was another p
care about the science and less about the politics. >> do the -- does the specter of any type of price controls for pharmaceuticals, is that on the horizon for this country, or are we -- will we still lead the world in innovation because we won't -- we're not stupid enough to try to figure prices there? >> that's a leading question. >> it is. >> but the one major explicit price control mechanism in obama care is called an ipad board. and i can't -- i cannot remember this early hour what that stands for. but that one is -- if there's going to be anything that's overturned, it will be the ipad board. neither democrats nor republicans like it. it's -- the board, the -- >> independent payment -- >> thank you. the death panel so to speak. but it looks like it's -- >> you agree with me that the innovation has been stifled by not being able to charge what it takes to develop the drug, right? >> well, innovation is a funny thing. it's not necessarily dollar to dollar. i mean, sometimes you can just drop a soda in a -- you know, a petri dish and get penicillin like fleming did. >> that's not th
to understand there is no established science right now to determine whether or not a gene will predispose someone to violent behavior. i mean that's the first thing. this is a very complicated situation. people have genes. they don't always predispose or actually turn into a specific problem. and in this case if someone were to be found to have a gene, and this is a needle in a haystack, it might give some clues as to whether or not someone might or, other people might be predisposed to this kind of crime. heather: this would be a first of a kind study or a first of a kind research to >> again, there have been studies that have been done on violent offenders, and previously and we have gotten some body of evidence that helped us to determine whether this is a problem. where it is more established, where we're doing genetic testing where it is incredibly value in determining predisposing conditions such as taysak's disease or whether someone ends up with sickle cell anemia. whether someone is predisposed to alzheimer's or cancer it gets controversial and this particular probably the most c
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> i'll tell you, it might be the middle of winter, but it's more like the cast of "some like it hot" here at the exchange. it's in french. i'll let you say the actual name of this group. a group of ballet enthusiasts founded in 1974, professional male dancers. everything from ballet to modern dance, classical, original works. it's definitely adding an air of levity to the occasion. in a couple seconds, the opening bell at the nyse. as we said, at the big board, the ballet from monte carlo. performing until january 6th in new york city. and over at the nasdaq, a group that does a lot of good work at this time of the year, the salvation army. >> some like it hot. >> interesting. >> the birth cage. bird cage. >> looking where we are opening, no surprise to the down side here. initially out of the gate, one of their biggest losers is microsoft, down by more than a percent. we were talking about whether or not there will be any upside to pc sales. a lot of the data points indicated by "the new york times"
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> italy's mario monti announcing he would consider seeking a second term as italian prime minister if approached by allies that are committed to actually backing his reforms. michelle caruso-cabrera joins us on set. you can see that andrew was taking some shots. >> a new camera. >> i'm so used to it wherever i go. andrew, we've got the fire behind you. >> it's summer cute. >> the sweater. >> yeah. >> but it's an orange -- i don't understand why it's orange. it's hal weeb. >> it's a red sweater. >> look at it. i know it's coming a little bit orangey. >> on tv. >> okay. >> lovely. thank you. love the guys in the control room. >> so here's italy. silvio berlusconi. your intro was about mario monti which is all true. silvio berlusconi, the former prime minister of italy -- >> my favorite. >> thank goodness for silvio berlusconi. >> look at his hair. what is he, 76? >> 76. he just sat down with cnbc italy over the weekend. silvio berlusconi says he does not want to run for prime minister, but, he is oblig
, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. gee you are watching cnbc's "squawk on the street," live from the financial capital on the world. the opening bell set to ring on that balcony in a couple minutes there the big board, west virginia university and syracuse university, the football teams playing in the new era pinstripe bowl at yankee stadium this saturday. i know melissa is going p. >> for sure. we are carpooling, right, carl? >> at the nasdaq, iraq and afghanistan, veterans of america, a non-profit organization with more than 200,000 members. great to see them today as well. a lot of charity this morning, even on the general news morning shows about facebook. if you haven't heard already, randi zuckerberg posted a pitch of her family, thought it was private, somebody saw it on their feed, put it on twitter, she responded angrily saying it was way uncool and beyond human decency and it has raised, once again this argument, debate about privacy settings and whether or not you should tru
, religion, science, philosophy, sports. whether the empire got it right last week, didn't call it second base. whether or not the nature of dark matter will be first discovered by microphysicists rather than astrophysicists. it's all part of the speech and thought and belief that's protected by the first amendment. you can't think of it just in political terms. it's important. and there's a third dimension. speech is what allows you to define your persona, your personality. your speech, your thought, your beliefs or who you are. and this is an essential human right. now, the supreme court in its first amendment cases has protected speech. that is hideous. we only get those cases we had a case recently protecting speech, videos, where it was described to me, i never look at these things, women in spikes heels killing little animals. we protected the oath. it was protected speech. we protected speech when on the day of a funeral of a service man killed in the middle east, there were protesters using derogatory words about gays, saying the military is all going to be doomed to predition bec
than politics. art, culture, religion, science, philosophy, sports. whether the empire got it right last week, whether or not the nature of dark matter is going to be first discovered by michael businesses rather than astrophysicists. this is all part of speech and thought that is protected by the first amendment. can't think of it just in political terms. then there's a third dimension, that speech is what allows you to define your persona and your personality. your speech, your thoughts, your belief, are who you are. and this is an essential human right. now, the supreme court in its first amendment case has protected speech. that is habeas -- habeas. we only get those cases. [laughter] >> we had a case recently protecting speech, video where there was described to me, i never look at these things, women in spiked heels killing little animals. we protected that. it was protected speech. we protected speech on the day of a funeral of a servicemen killed in the middle east. there were protesters and using derogatory words about gays, saying that the military would be doomed because
is something they are not able to do. someone who is getting a bachelor of science in nursing can afford to take on more debt than someone getting a degree in religious studies or a low income field. it does not mean you should abandon the degree. it means you should pay attention to the debt, because you may abandon the dream later. >> not all the trees are worth as much is something those of us -- all degrees are worth as much is something those of us who love liberal arts in the united states have a hard time coming to grips with. >> or journalism. >> is -- it obviously makes people uncomfortable that the situation is further curtailed by the family were born into. if you are a wonderful high school student, you have to think more about your major and your college than a student born into a wealthy family. how do you balance that with the reality of this crisis. >> one of the things we do at the national consumer law center is direct representation of low- income borrowers as well as speak to thousands of borrowers throughout the country. we do see the effect of this threw out the cou
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to "squawk box." shares of marvell technology falling this morning. company says they're going to seek to overturn a jury's patent infringement finding. yesterday a federal jury found marvell infringed two patents held by carnegie mellon. the chipmaker has been ordered to pay $1.2 billion in damages. another big payday maybe for -- >> lawyers. >> now to the winter storm slamming the east coast. the weather channel's reynolds wolf joins us now with more. is this one named, reynolds? >> this one is indeed named. this one is given the name euclid. go figure. i say that spells trouble. it's certainly going to spell trouble for people trying to travel out of new york. you look at this color code behind us, where you happen to see the orange and the yellow. just like on a traffic light you're going to have a little bit of caution there. but ground travel at least air travel may come to a screeching halt in places like boston, portland, maine, mind you and even i
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)